2020 F1 SEASON INCL SPOILERS

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abbot
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If toe, caster and camber confuses you then I suggest you need a copy of this

Car Suspension & Handling

elie boone
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DAS system is not allowed for 2021 season, if it will be allowed this season is an open question, it's most likely that there will be a complaint against it on the first race and then we will see. By altering the toe in or out you change the contact patch of the tyre with the asphalt, question is of Mercedes can prove this is not the case.

TomB
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I think the argument for legality is that it affects the toe, which is set by the steering rack.  The regs say that the suspension can't be modified while the car is moving, but this isn't suspension, its a steering component, which obviously moves.  I wonder if it is a mechanical, electrical or hydraulic system?  A neat loop hole that's been exploited.  

Harry Flatters
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ISTBC, camber would alter the tyre contact patch, but changing the toe angle would not. Imagine you stand a tyre on the ground then twist it through 90 deg - contact patch is unchanged.  

aerobod
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ISTBC, camber would alter the tyre contact patch, but changing the toe angle would not. Imagine you stand a tyre on the ground then twist it through 90 deg - contact patch is unchanged.

....but SAI (Steering Axis Inclination) and castor alters the contact patch due to camber changes relative to the straight-ahead position as the steering angle changes. So camber is connected to steering angle and hence toe angle is too. It depends on the correlation of the camber angle to slip angle to longitudinal axis of the car.

James

abbot
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I once had an old car that you could move the steering wheel backwards and forwards on the axis of the column.  It did not instill a lot of confidence and was pretty quickly corrected.

 

elie boone
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A similar system was developed 12 years ago by Prodrive but not for a racing car.

Roger King
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 To me, this just demonstrates that the FIA do not want innovation and would actually prefer the cars to all be clones of one another. I long for the days of the 1960s and 1970s when you could try anything - ground effect, turbos, six wheels, gas turbines, monocoque chassis, engine as a stressed member, etc. These were all new ideas at the time, some eventually  becoming part of the normal way of doing things and some dying as miserable failures. I can understand a ban if the innovation proves to make the sport more dangerous (such as the speeds that skirted cars were cornering at when track safety was of a much lower standard than today), but this just seems to be a ban to stop someone gaining a possible advantage. Before someone mentions the fan car, this gave rise to phenomenal cornering speeds, was arguably illegal anyway because of the moving aerodynamic parts, and was throwing debris in the faces of following drivers.

Harry Flatters
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You're right Roger. The current and upcoming 2021 regs seem to just want to stifle innovation. Ross Brawn has already said that for 2021 they have put in place procedures whereby they can shut down any developments that seems to exploit the regs, in double quick time - says the inventor of the double diffuser!!! Bit goose and gander, if you ask me.

I loved the 'F' Duct from McLaren and in the same way I really like the Mercedes DAS system. Alan Permane at Renault is already bitching about it, Ferrari are clearly pissed off and Racing Point are wagging their figure saying the benefit will have to justify the investment - no shit, really!  If these teams put half the amount of energy into innovating as they do into whining, F1 would be so much more exciting.

rgrigsby
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I'd hate to be the one trying to run F1 at the moment.

If you look at last year there were some good races, but the huge gap between the top 3 and the rest of the field isn't showing any signs of going away.

Equally, there were numerous occasions when the cars just couldn't get close to each other due the aero setup they currently have.

Unfortunately it's the same in a lot of sports at the moment, whatever rules you define we are in a world where teams can invest huge amounts of money and time optimising things t the nth degree and often going against the "spirit" of the sport.

You only have to look at the mess in running that Nike have caused with their Vaporfly shoes to see what can happen, it's not just F1 that struggles with this.

The budget cap seems like a good starting point, there was an Autosport article a month or so ago that implied the cost of running a 2 car team with reasonable development is around $100M per year. 

That seems to leave a fair amount for space for innovation on top without allowing the big spending teams to go crazy. Remember that figure doesn't include the drivers salaries or to team management.

I agree the increasingly stringent rules are far from ideal, the question is do we want one or two teams running away with the championship or 8-10 teams all having a chance of a win?

I'm looking forward to this year, the cars are going to be faster than they have ever been. the consistency of rules hopefully means there gaps close up a bit.

I think we have to give the 2021 rules a go and see how it works, Adrian Newey has been very vocal saying he's not happy with the restrictions. If the racing improves and it becomes more of a driver's championship maybe that's a good thing.

Robert