The begining of the end of the traditional internal combustion engine???

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Blokko
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The begining of the end of the traditional internal combustion engine???

Volvo has announced that all new models will be hybrid or electric within 2 years.  Bit of a headline grabber - the analysts have pointed out that existing models would continue to be built using the current engine line-up until they are superseded by new models and that this is a strategy that most of the other volume manufacturers are heading towards (though on slightly different timelines).

That said, with Tesla about to massively ramp up production and with new hybrid models coming to market all the time, it does seem now that hybrid / electric is moving from the realms of the quirky (only used by tree huggers and those who are very sensitive to mpg cost) to the mainstream.

I mentioned the Hyundai Ioniq in the Tesla thread.  It is currently the car with the highest quoted fuel efficiency figures in America (58mpg (US) - 70 mpg (UK)).  I read a report that Hyundai are expecting the 'ride share industry' (read 'Uber drivers') to be the largest market in the US for the base model.

Jonathan Kay
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I can't see the end but the change in the default model is getting pretty obvious.

  1. The feasibility of both hybrid and battery-only cars is proved at the levels of both engineering and personal use.
  2. The other pressures leading to "peak car" are relentless: inner city pollution, congestion, parking space, sharing models (as you say), *intolerance of "accidents"...

But there are still problems with range, and I expect prolonged use of range-extender ic engines, and I'd like to see that as a way of getting to electric drive and its many advantages. Even in future 7s.

Our familiarity (and, around here, love affair) with ic engines shouldn't hide the extraordinary complications they demand. We're carrying round **starter motors, alternators, clutches, gearboxes and liquid cooling systems that are only there because of the deficiencies of the prime mover. In comparison to some electric drive systems you could add final drives, diffs and halfshafts to that list. 

Jonathan

* Except to pedestrians and cyclists.

** Setright identified starter motors as the key technology enabling popular ownership of cars. I wish that he was around to discuss what's about to happen, and that I would be around long enough to read it.

 

Jonathan Kay
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nickh7
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A motorsport 7 didn't need much of a range does it. Apart from the odd endurance race that 7s take part in most are 20-30miles tops , sprints hilclimbs must be less than 2 per run. Surely an all electric 7 would not need a huge amount of batteries to cover that distance.  Yes different for road use but it's a start. 

 

 

"I take her to the floor, looking for a moment when the world feels right"

Jonathan Kay
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Tigger
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As Volvo's are the chosen vehicle of the caravan fraternity I hope the new breed of hybrids will have towing capacity!

Jonathan Kay
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What are the key requirements for towing, something like:

  1. Enough power
  2. Enough power under all conditions, including low engine speed
  3. Ability to pull the car and 'van on poor surfaces?

Electric drive is way ahead of ic engines with mechanical drive on 2 and 3. There's also the ability to use electric power to fill in the gaps left by ic engines, as used by Toyota and in quite a lot of supercars but for rather different reasons.

Jonathan

PS: You could even have a battery-only car and put a "range-extender" engine and fuel tank in the caravan...

 

 

A_redstone
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Key requirements are :

1. Driving pleasure

2. freedom of choice 

3.Exhaust note

4.acceleration

5.In cabin enjoyment 

So electric powered cars fail tests 1 and 2 .

thats that then

 

andy

 

 

 

 

 

November7
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Last week we attended a presentation by developers about proposed housing projects in this area. None of the houses had solar energy or heating panels and none had provision for charging electric vehicles. This was drawn to the attention of the developers who evidently had not heard the news from Volvo and now from France Confused .

john aston
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For everyday usage I can't say I am fussed what makes my car go. Electric is just fine by me , as it's cleaner, can give phenomenal shove, and it's quiet.  Exhaust noise? Very few mainstream cars actually make any  now , and even when they did most cars (Alfasud, Ford and Alfa Twincam et al  excepted) sounded awful . Stuff like AMG Mercs make an absurd amount of noise and bluster, as do any sporty Jags and ..err..Astons but if you are over 13 they just sound silly. I agree with James May - highly specialised cars like Sevens will survive as recreational tools  only. Like horses - few, if any,  people actually need a horse for transport but thousands own them for fun . 

Jonathan Kay
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None of the houses had solar energy or heating panels and none had provision for charging electric vehicles.

I don't know what should be put in for charging battery vehicles at home. If it's at a few points eg street lamps it would seem sensible to have something beefy such as the Tesla three-phase option. But I don't think those are sufficiently standardised yet.

But if it's on each property is more than single-phase needed... the car is typically there for several hours and overnight.

The lack of solar panels is daft: the technology is mature and the payback reasonable, particularly if they're installed at the initial build.

What's the current state of play for domestic-to-grid both in terms of technology and payment schemes?

Jonathan

PS: What was their policy on parking spaces per dwelling? There are some ambitiously low approaches knocking around.

PPS: The UK's insulation standards are very low. In the ?1970s my father was chairman of Fibreglass. He tried to convince central government that mandating better insulation in new houses was much much cheaper than building power stations, but couldn't.