The begining of the end of the traditional internal combustion engine???

590 posts / 0 new
Last post
aerobod
aerobod's picture
Offline
Last seen: 15 min 11 sec ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

Tyre particles are definitely a pollution problem, but I think their calculations are about a factor of 10 out over the useful life of a tyre. A family hatchback will have tyres weighing about 10kg each and about 25% of the tyre weight in useful tread depth over it's life. If the car is driven fairly aggressively you should still see at least 20,000km of life, leading to about 10kg of rubber shed. That would equate to 0.5g/km as opposed to 5.8g/km that they quote. At the track though, you could see 50g/km if trying hard.

James

john aston
john aston's picture
Offline
Last seen: 12 hours 4 min ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

F1 and FE are TV sports , essentially. A minority of the people who  attend Grands Prix is interested , or informed about anything apart from the big race . Such folk have always wandered off when the big boys aren't playing - I have seen it for myself with historic racers , GT and just about every support race except Pro Cars. 

Forget the noise , or lack of it, because not only does TV not even begin to convey the real thing,I believe that the current F1 car makes little noise, relatively , and what it does make is unremarkable.

F1 needs some contemporary credibility - of course its engines are efficient , but they still use 55 gallons of petrol in a 2 hour race . And yes , FE leccy has to come from somewhere but what really , really matters is image-like it or not . 

And I think F1 needs FE 's emission free vibe as much as FE needs F1's TV audience .     

Of course I wish everything had a screaming  V12 but I'm a dinosaur , most of us are.

Consider this F1 has 4 major manufacturers , FE has double that - including Mercedes and Porsche

   
 

abbot
abbot's picture
Offline
Last seen: 15 hours 34 min ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

Modern Tyres fitted to todays cars are a bit of a bug bear with me.  They seem to be more focused on noise and rolling resistance rather than grip and wet weather performance.  I always understood that if wanted better grip then your tyres wore out quicker.

Jonathan Kay
Jonathan Kay's picture
Online
Last seen: 2 min 44 sec ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

Detail to follow presumably.

How many points do you need in the UK to never be more than 30 miles from one?

Jonathan

garybee
Offline
Last seen: 2 hours 50 min ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

It'd be about 75 charge points.  That's not accurate due to the shape of the coastline etc etc but it's in that range.  

There's a huge difference between being within 30 miles of a charge point and being able to charge your car of course.  Although I'm sure anyone that gives it more than half a second's thought has worked that out.  So pretty much the definition of a false premise.

Jonathan Kay
Jonathan Kay's picture
Online
Last seen: 2 min 44 sec ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

Thanks.

They're planning another review of charging infrastructure this summer... we'll see if that headline version of something important is pursued. I saw one suggestion that business premises will be targetted.

Carrots
Plug-in EV grants to continue to 2022/23 but with cap reduced to £3k. Also schemes for commercial vehicles and motorbikes. 
VED exemption up to 2025.
Expensive car supplement exemption.

Missing sticks
Fuel duty not increased.

Jonathan

Jonathan Kay
Jonathan Kay's picture
Online
Last seen: 2 min 44 sec ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

A couple of multimodal snapshots of the future:

Jonathan

Jonathan Kay
Jonathan Kay's picture
Online
Last seen: 2 min 44 sec ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

James has pointed out the problems with battery power at low temperatures. The Tesla Model Y has a heat pump!

Jonathan

StevehS3
StevehS3's picture
Offline
Last seen: 3 hours 8 min ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

I was very much against electric and Tesla but I have to confess I have warmed to them. It's hard to avoid the compelling advantages. Even for motorsport I changed my mind and quite look forward to a change to quite cars and keeping the ICEs as a treat for historic events. At Le Mans 24 I started loving the thundering Corvettes and screaming Ferraris but after 24 hours I came to appreciate the Audis wafting past giving the impression of technological advantage. I'll get my coat!

Jonathan Kay
Jonathan Kay's picture
Online
Last seen: 2 min 44 sec ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

Updated report on battery manufacturing from the Faraday Institute, includes:

Governments and legislatures around the world are increasingly committed to the electrification of road transport as a means to reach Net Zero and decarbonisation commitments. Car manufacturers are responding. They are investing now in the production of electric vehicles (EVs), which will result in a corresponding decrease in internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicle production. Given the lead-times involved, and the possibility that new sales of petrol and diesel vehicles will end in 2035, it will not be long before they stop investing in new production lines for vehicles equipped with internal combustion engines.

The question is not whether this transition will occur. Rather, the question is whether some of the new generations of EVs will be produced in the UK, or whether the UK will gradually cease to be a manufacturer of vehicles and become an importer.

The answer to this question will depend in part, of course, on whether the UK remains a sensible place for manufacturers to locate the production of vehicles, the vast majority of which are currently destined for export. This will heavily depend, in turn, on the final outcome of the post-Brexit trade negotiations. But, alongside the issue of the UK’s trading relationship with the EU, the most important determinant of the future health of the automotive industry in this country will be whether batteries are manufactured in the UK.

Jonathan