Do airplanes have locks?

16 posts / 0 new
Last post
tangomikeromeo
tangomikeromeo's picture
Offline
Last seen: 21 min 3 sec ago
Joined: 17/04/2014
Do airplanes have locks?

I'm stuck in Germany as Ciara pokes holes in British infrastructure. Having seen the BA crew toddle off to their hotel a few of us are left wondering are there locks and ignition keys for planes as cars?

Depending on information received, how many more beers we have and what You Tube has on 'how to fly a 7x7' we're thinking  we could have a go. 

PoBC. Have they left it unlocked?

Jonathan Kay
Jonathan Kay's picture
Online
Last seen: 52 sec ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

It seems to vary.

Jonathan

PS: You could always watch Airplane Repo while youre waiting. :-)

aerobod
aerobod's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 hours 41 min ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

No commercial aircraft with over 20 seats that I have seen has any form of lock. They depend on physical security at the airport that they are unattended at with badge or punch locks on the jetways and/or gates and doors to access the tarmac combined with a level of complexity that generally precludes anyone other than a pilot from operating them. Most commercial aircraft with a cockpit door also have a keypad for access with a company-wide keycode needed to open the door that authorised personel such as crew and maintenance staff have.

On the other hand, as with many "secure" facilities, getting a job as a cleaner is usually the easiest way to get unattended access to an aircraft. There is one famous case of a Q400 being stolen by an employee working as a ground handler: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2018_Horizon_Air_Q400_incident

James

tangomikeromeo
tangomikeromeo's picture
Offline
Last seen: 21 min 3 sec ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

Thanks aerobod. Sadly the pizza has turned up so we'll let those that normally sit at the front have the responsibility tomorrow.

And the beer is too good to fly away from. SM25T showed me the light years ago and I failed to follow! 

SM25T
SM25T's picture
Online
Last seen: 1 min 11 sec ago
Joined: 17/04/2014
Weissbier rules. You could get a train home from Germany.
C20 WUN
C20 WUN's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 day 9 min ago
Joined: 08/06/2019

I used to work on Gulfstream private jets and although the door had a lock, they all had the same key.... 

Guy Lachlan​

 

 

Derek Batty
Derek Batty's picture
Online
Last seen: 9 min 16 sec ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

Think there’s ususllybone on the bog 

derek

aerobod
aerobod's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 hours 41 min ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

But those who know how to lift the outside "lavatory" sign can circumvent the inside latch! Same as knowing that the seemingly fixed armrests next to the aisle actually have a hidden release latch underneath near the hinge that allows them to swing up. Or that when the cabin crew say "cross check complete", they are referring to the little red cross in the sight glass in the main doors that indicates that the emergency slides are armed.

James

DougBaker
DougBaker's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 hours 7 min ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

At least we can be confident that this is never a question you should try to answer after a few too many drinks.

BBC - Chloe Haines jailed for trying to open Stansted plane door mid-flight

aerobod
aerobod's picture
Offline
Last seen: 5 hours 41 min ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

Once the aircraft is moving beyond takeoff speed, even without cabin pressurization there is a force of 10,000N or so on each main door due to dynamic pressure from the external airflow over the shape of the fuselage. Once at cruising altitude that force mainly due to cabin pressurization is about 100,000N on a main door and 20,000N on an over-wing exit.

James

Geoff Brown
Geoff Brown's picture
Online
Last seen: 1 min 37 sec ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

Albert had locking hasps on the inside handles of the para doors at the rear & an external hasp for a padlock on the crew door. To not lock it on completion of the flight servicing or rectification was negligent. On civvy airfields the key was usually left with the handling agent. On military airfields the key was slipped down the side of the battery in its bay. 

I suppose any one could start & run an aircraft as there are flight sims & other info out there. Airfield staff depending on their access could read the relevant aircraft manuals. If not it could be a bit of a puzzle unless you have completed the operating & handling course.