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Alexander Gurr
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Getting my PPL
I know have posted about this on here before, but my lovely wife bought me the start of my PPL for my birthday earlier this month....despite being heavily pregnant with baby Gurr #4! Being based in Hertford it made sense to do this at Panshanger, which I have been to once before and which seems lovely! I am about a quarter of the way through the training manual, but wanted to know what pearls of wisdom people might have for me before my first lesson (I have experienced flights in small planes a fair few times before) and throughout my training! I really am very excited and just want to get going....I really do wish this baby would make an appearance All advice would be warmly received
Jonathan Kay
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My ancient experiences are in the archives. Does it still make sense to get all the theory tests done asap? Are there something like online tutorials nowadays? Have a great time Jonathan
Pete Underhill
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On the morning of the first lesson, have a light breakfast. My son had his first lesson on his 12th birthday. Birthday breakfast was a full English. However, when it transpired that mum and dad could tag along in the back of the Piper Cherokee, I had the dubious delight of carrying the barf bag containing the remains of breakfast for the second half of the flight.
Colouring in for a living - it's not REAL work, is it?
Mike C.
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That’s brilliant – and nice time of the year to start flying: • First couple of lessons should be a heady mix of excitement, amazement and enjoyment – but coupled with an element of ‘how will I ever learn all this?’ • Absolute key is a first class instructor (you get on with) – ideally a ‘career instructor’ not ‘an hours builder’, a good local flying school, with top quality facilities and equipment. • Make sure you are clearly briefed before each flight and debriefed afterwards – it makes the time in the cockpit far more effective • Initially, especially when the days are long and the weather is good, try to do several hours a week – the pace of progress is much faster and you’ll quickly go from feeling like a passenger to believing you are a pilot • Try to fly at quiet times – weekends can be very busy at some GA airfields – early mornings, evenings, weekdays and you may even have the circuit to yourselves • You should be solo within c.15 hrs. It’s not a race, so don’t worry, but it’s a brilliant experience and one of the best days of your life – and you won’t be nervous. Thereafter the learning accelerates. • Do keep up the ground work and join one of the relevant pilot forums, such as Flyer Forum • Also important to stress that, whilst you can get the PPL(A) ticket in c.45 hrs, that’s only the beginning of the learning curve, so don’t rush the training – you’ll want to keep your instructor as an on-going friend and coach. • With the right approach it is one of the most challenging and rewarding things you can ever learn to do. • Finally – keep us advised of progress
Grubbster
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With just 7 hours in my log book I'm not best placed to advise really, but I used my first lesson simply to determine is this something I really wanted to do as a hobby - knowing that there is a lot of work required to achieve a license. I was surprised at how much there is to do while flying, my instructor is gradually increasing my workload and I am now at the stage where I sometimes wonder when I'll manage to do it all! I have taken off a few times and landed once already and soon I'll be doing circuits so it must be coming together reasonably well
grenpayne
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Great advice from Mike C and I've not much else to add other than work done on the ground pays massive dividends in the air. When I went through RAF pilot training (17 Years ago now) the biggest thing I found was running out of 'capacity' ie your brain cannot process any more info and this is where prep work really helps. Initially you'll find you're very focused on what's going on in the cockpit, but as you progress and your capacity builds you'll find you're able to assimilate info to build a picture of what's going on outside the aircraft. Above all though, enjoy it and try not to put too much pressure on yourself during each lesson.
Jonathan Kay
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Yes. Isn't it amazing how you chunk tasks that used to demand all your concentration? Jonathan
fatcat
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Six and half hours logged against training for a PPL(G) and loving every moment of it. Still wondering how I'm going to manage to navigate and communicate as well aviate - either it gets easier or I'm going to need a new brain. Beginning to sound like we need a new section on the forum, Slightly Higher Flying or Sevens in the Sky or something. This is a lot like a Seven with an aeroscreen Alex, keep posting how you get on - and good luck with the baby
Mike C.
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Quoting Jonathan Kay: Yes. Isn't it amazing how you chunk tasks that used to demand all your concentration? Jonathan You're right, the brain is very adept at learning to manage the workload - you want to try fling helicopters. But it obviously helps to fly as regularly as possible to maintain the continuity. I've never used flight simulation programmes, but some ab initio pilots say that it can help. However, be aware that you are taught to fly using outside visual references (to recognise the correct attitude of the a/c), and only occasional reference to the instrument panel. The instructor won't like it if you are looking inside too much - the Instrument Rating comes later Once you've gone 'solo' - which will come around quite soon - your instructor will encourage you to build up your solo hours in the circuit, which is great fun - and looking to your right and realising that you are the only one in the a/c, flying alone, is a unique feeling. What type of a/c are you training on?
Token Jock
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Good luck Alex My wife got her PPL last year and I am so proud of her During her training She had some difficult times with weather aborting many lessons, getting the landings right so she could do more solo and move onto the cross country qualifying flight and the the skills test. I suppose for her it was a dogged determination to complete and get the PPL that pulled her through in the end. Now it is great, we always try and hire a plane when we go on holiday and I get to be "back seat pilot" Hope you enjoy your flying
Delbert
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You Batsrads , I had put this out of my mind for a good few years , Spent a good few hours last night and tonight looking at local flying clubs and balancing up the trackday budget vs £140 an hour