182 posts / 0 new
Last post
rich01483
rich01483's picture
Offline
Last seen: 4 years 8 months ago
Joined: 17/04/2014
I can only echo most of the advice here. I finished an integrated training course not too long ago, and now fly jets for a living Work done on the ground pays dividends, I am still very much in the learning phase (and suspect I always will be!) - but the simple things you can learn on the ground (e.g radio phraseology, checks/procedures etc.) will free up an awful lot more capacity for things you can focus on in the air. Another fairly morbid piece of advice is to read accident reports and air safety publications. Much can be learned from most incidents, and will improve your situational awareness and threat identification. Also, pay attention in ground school - quite a lot of this is very relevant when flying, and the better you understand it, the more sense many things will make in the air.
Neal
Neal's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 years 7 months ago
Joined: 17/04/2014
Good thread this - PPL is definitely on my list too but in a few years I suspect! Only thing I'd like to add is that I did an introductory lesson at Panshanger a couple of months' back and was very impressed - really lovely place and my instructor (guy called Jordan IIRC) seemed like a really good bloke, professional and relaxed. Keep us posted, be really interested to know how you find the experience. My initial reaction was certainly "how do you fit all this in your brain?!"
Alexander Gurr
Alexander Gurr's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 1 day ago
Joined: 17/04/2014
Thanks for the advice guys...there are some really useful pointers in there I am 100 pages into the first manual, which is keeping the excitment levels up somewhat. We just need baby to make an apperance so I can actually book some lessons in I am hoping that I can get at least 10 hours in this year and start building some momentum up...I could see how important this will be if I am to keep going with it. The challenge will always be ballancing it with family commitments, along with trying to squeeze the odd Grads race in here and there I will certainly keep you all posted
Grubbster
Offline
Last seen: 4 hours 45 min ago
Joined: 17/04/2014
Quoting Mike C.:  What type of a/c are you training on? I'm in a Piper PA28, seems fine for the job if a little old and scruffy!
Mike C.
Mike C.'s picture
Offline
Last seen: 6 days 15 hours ago
Joined: 17/04/2014
I did my ab initio years ago in PA28s and Cessna 152/172s. Went solo in a lovely C152 Aerobat. The high wing aircraft are particularly nice as you look out the side window and see the port undercarriage dangling, and the ground way below. All great little training aircraft - many quite old - but bit like 'Trigger's Broom' Carol Vorderman did her training on a PA28 at Gloucs, although I think she may also be flying a Cirrus SR22 (the one with the built in parachute ) BTW the advice about reading accident reports is very sound. It's not meant to alarm you - nearly all accidents are avoidable and usually the result of a sequence of stupid errors. The reports are helpful in understanding this and useful to discuss with your instructor.
Delbert
Delbert's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 years 1 month ago
Joined: 17/04/2014
Couple of questions 1) what is a realistic budget to complete the 45 hours etc 2) what is the realistic timeframe I hear that maintaining your PPL is more expensive ? What am I looking at ?
Mike C.
Mike C.'s picture
Offline
Last seen: 6 days 15 hours ago
Joined: 17/04/2014
Quoting Delbert: Couple of questions 1) what is a realistic budget to complete the 45 hours etc 2) what is the realistic timeframe I hear that maintaining your PPL is more expensive ? What am I looking at ? Typically, I would say that the PPL(A) would be completed over 12 months, averaging an hour a week. Starting in the summer, try to optimise the hours, as there will be some disruption in winter (but lots of time for ground school) and then you would be completing the course next summer ready to enjoy your licence. 45 hrs is the guide, some take a bit longer - but I guess you just multiply the hours by the 'dual' rate for the school/aircraft you will be flying, plus an allowance for books, exams, medical, misc, etc (nice to have your own personal headset). So, £10k+ (ish)? Once qualified, you'll want to stay current, so ideally flying at least a couple of times a month - but you can reduce costs by joining a group and you are allowed to share costs (but not charge) passengers. It's never going to be cheap, but it can be a life changing experience and a unique skill to have mastered.
Jonathan Kay
Jonathan Kay's picture
Online
Last seen: 1 min 33 sec ago
Joined: 17/04/2014
Quoting Mike C.: ... the advice about reading accident reports is very sound. It's not meant to alarm you - nearly all accidents are avoidable and usually the result of a sequence of stupid errors. The reports are helpful in understanding this and useful to discuss with your instructor.A lot of the safety initiatives in medicine are designed to be like those in aviation. There's a long way to go. Jonathan
Alexander Gurr
Alexander Gurr's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 1 day ago
Joined: 17/04/2014
Just to keep you all updated...lesson 1 has now been completed and my first official hour logged. Lesson 2 is booked for Thursday and I can't wait
Mike C.
Mike C.'s picture
Offline
Last seen: 6 days 15 hours ago
Joined: 17/04/2014
Enjoy the fine weather, although most a/c fly better when it's cold.