Intro to Sprinting.....28th Sept, don't miss out

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fordy
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Do you need to have your seven with you for the Intro day? I don’t think mine will be ready in time.

Graham Howard
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Most of the day is spent driving, so you need your seven with you to get the most out of it.

If you just want to come along and learn about car preparation,  walk the track with a champion and experience some passenger rides with experienced sprinters,  you would be most welcome. 

Graham Howard
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Just to expand on Paul's comment that you can use the car you already own.

There is minimal preparation needed to compete, the major requirement is a track day roll over bar (or a cage). And you won't be more competitive by spending loads of cash on upgrades. The major factor is always the driver and there will be a class suited to your car whether it has 125 bhp or 300 bhp. 

Most of us competitors have been deluded enough to spend money with changes to our cars and seen  minimal improvement in results. 

And if you are not winning there is always somebody at a similar level to compete against. The lure of competition keeps us coming back for more.

PaulCo
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Which reminds me of something that I heard at the last Intro to Sprinting; one participant saying to another that he hadn't quite appreciated the depth of ability that his car possessed, having never really "pushed" on track before.

There can't be many cars, if any (this side of a 911 GT3), that are so competent and comfortable being driven at the limit on track. As a direct result of the car's upbringing and history, this is where a Seven is completely at home.

Those of us who compete regularly, and have done so for some time, will confirm that, with a bit of sensible maintenance, reliability just isn't an issue. Yet another benefit of lightness being that mechanical bits don't get over-stressed.

So even if you were only a little curious, just sign up and find out what your car is really like.

Paul

smnicolson
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Presume a caterham trackday roll bar doesnt count?

Stephen Nicolson Caterham 310 S
Comp Sec
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Stephen,

I confirm that you need a Trackday Rollbar or better.

Chris Bramall - Competition Secretary   Northampton Motorsport Lotus Seven Club Speed Championship 2020    
Graham Howard
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Another fantastic aspect of the series is the camaraderie between competitors.

Countless times I have seen somebody with a technical issue being helped out by a fellow competitor so they can continue the day's competition.....in fact it is not unusual to see several drivers working on a rival's car to solve an issue.

And if car cannot be fixed it is a common for a rival to offer a dual drive.

Speaking of dual drives.......there are several partners and offspring who share a car. This is a great way to include family members actively in the day....and it can make the sport even more affordable.

 

PaulCo
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There are a number of theories relating to dual drives; one is that the driver who runs first acts as tyre warmer for the second driver. The reality is that this only really makes a significant difference on the first run of the day (first practice). As the day progresses, there is sufficient residual heat in the tyre to remove any real advantage.

Another line of thinking is that the driver change-over increases the potential for something going wrong. However it takes very little time for a routine to fall into place, and any belt and seat adjustments become second nature.

My own (limited) experience proved to be very positive; a feeling of being part of a team effort, and the advantage of a second opinion on the car. Feedback can be useful.

But to share a car with a family member must bring an extra level of enjoyment to what is already an extremely enjoyable day.

Why not bring a significant other, or a trusted offspring to the Introduction to Sprinting? They need to be a club member, and it helps if they are there willingly. There is no pressure to drive beyond what each feels comfortable with, and in the future, may make upgrades easier to justify (just a thought).

And it will be a cracking day out.

            

CaterBram
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In my 10 years of competing i've competed solo, Dual driver with my brother, and dual drive with my son.

I do enjoy the dual drive and you do get into a routine...

but can be frustrating when they drive quicker than you can in your own car......

 

Chris Bramall - Deep in the YoSDeNS area...

Graham Howard
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This Sunday is the second of 2 annual club sprints held at the Curborough, Near Lichfield. There are 57 members keenly anticipating the day of driving their 7 in the way it was designed........flat out. Over the next couple of days  many are likely checking their cars over to make sure that they perform at their best on the day.

There is a certain atmosphere  at a Lotus 7 club sprint in the time between competitors arriving and the first practice run. Drivers  walking the course to see where an apex can be cut tighter or looking for surface changes to use a turn in or braking points. Cars being  scrutineered to ensure they meet the safety regulations, tyre pressures being checked, and engines being warmed.

.....or some are just enjoying a coffee and chatting to their fellow competitors and rivals for the day.........and as expected there are some wind up merchants who will use  this opportunity to talk up their advantage. It is all very good natured.

As Murray Walker once said "You can cut the tension with a cricket stump."

As the  day progresses the real battles are engaged and performances on the track do the talking. As another famous racing driver said......"When the flag drops the BS stops."

If you are thinking about the intro day and you are at a loose end on Sunday, come along to Curborough  to find out a little more about sprinting. Any of the members competing will be pleased to talk to you.