Jackie Stewart was on the Today programme this morning and Race Against Dementia was covered

7 posts / 0 new
Last post
Golf Juliet Tango
Offline
Last seen: 1 hour 19 min ago
Joined: 17/04/2014
Jackie Stewart was on the Today programme this morning and Race Against Dementia was covered

After he had talked about the latest F1 and the likely champion, he spent three or four minutes on Race Against Dementia; how it would be working and why he thought it would bring a new dimension to the research.

From 08:28 when the sports section starts to about 08:34 when they do the headlines.

Geoff Brown
Geoff Brown's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 days 14 hours ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

JS was on Marr on Sunday last week. Had a 20 minute slot & talked just about RAD & the fact that he is going to use the best of F1 planning & technology to teach graduates how to expedite research in to a possible cure when they are placed in the best research labs around the world at RAD expense. 

Golf Juliet Tango
Offline
Last seen: 1 hour 19 min ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

I'm glad that Race Against Dementia is gaining a bit of publicity and thus traction.

Stephen Hubbard

Democratic dissent is not disloyalty, it is a positive civic duty

Jonathan Kay
Jonathan Kay's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 hour 38 min ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

We heard that.

My wife asked why he wasn't impressed with Hamilton.

I hadn't understood RAD, and assumed that it was basically fundraising. After listening I did a bit of reading. I don't expect that F1 angle to bring much else to the medical research.

Jonathan

Geoff Brown
Geoff Brown's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 days 14 hours ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

JK.

From what JS discussed with Marr I understand that he wants to introduce F1 teams ability to 'think outside the box' to bring solutions quickly & efficiently to a conclusion. JS sees the F1 ability to accomplish fixes between races, sometimes over five days, as a solution for fast tracking research.

It is only methodology & logic pathways that need to be adapted for his goal.

Always a risk but a noble endeavor. To not to try is to fail in the first place. 

One mantra used in the military covers this: 'Respond, adapt, overcome'. Apologies for rearranging the order to any military or ex military reading this.

Jonathan Kay
Jonathan Kay's picture
Offline
Last seen: 1 hour 38 min ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

Thanks.

Yes, that's what I've picked up. But I don't think that those lessons are transferable to biomedical research. The time pressures are pretty intense already, both from the competition inherent in modern research and the commercial side. 

Jonathan

PS:

I know of two exercises where F1 pit stops were used in comparison with existing clinical processes. Both both illuminating and fun. And rather similar to Gawande's checklists, which rapidly moved into routine practice. In contrast to biomedical research it's often worthwhile changing those processes.

And commercial aviation, of course, is the model for nearly all recent attempts to improve clinical safety.

Golf Juliet Tango
Offline
Last seen: 1 hour 19 min ago
Joined: 17/04/2014
I am fully in favour of his objectives but I consider his view that medical research isn't working quickly enough is a bit superficial.

Medical research has caveats regarding a scrupulous attention to safety (yes, F1 is also safety conscious but the level of acceptable risk is very different) and I suspect the brain is considerably more complex than an F1 car. The influences over the development of chronic disease may not just go back a lifetime but generations.

Stephen Hubbard

Democratic dissent is not disloyalty, it is a positive civic duty