A question on US elections

5 posts / 0 new
Last post
Golf Juliet Tango
Offline
Last seen: 56 min 9 sec ago
Joined: 17/04/2014
A question on US elections
The Presidential election is simple, largest popular vote in a state takes all that state's votes in the electoral college (with two state exceptions). This is clear to me.

The House elections are single seat constituencies and this is clear too. (But two year terms seem short.)

Blokko
Blokko's picture
Offline
Last seen: 2 hours 2 min ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

6-year terms, with a third of seats being up for grabs every 2 years, I believe.  

Steve.
Proud poster of mindless drivel on BlatChat since 2006.  

Golf Juliet Tango
Offline
Last seen: 56 min 9 sec ago
Joined: 17/04/2014

Yes, Steve.

But ⅓ of the states every two years with both senators up for election?

One ballot with two picks per elector?

Stephen

Democratic dissent is not disloyalty, it is a positive civic duty

ian.pursglove
ian.pursglove's picture
Offline
Last seen: 22 min 5 sec ago
Joined: 25/06/2018

It varies with both houses having different terms; the Senate has six year terms (1/3 elected every two years so a rolling membership and each state has two Senators) and the House of Representatives being elected every two years (on even numbered years and with the number per state being proportional to population). 

These means there are elections in each state every two years (using different systems depending on the state) for the House and elections in 2/6 years for the Senate in each state.

If there is an issue, and I avoid the politics in saying this, it is that the 'churn' in the Senate is very low and once elected in a safe state it can pretty much be a job for life with a lot ore power and influence than the typical MP will ever have. That said, a number of states have changing demographics and some previously safe states are seeing some closer races now (although the chances of a Democratic or Republican win in some states are vanishingly small). Churn in the house is much greater and status in national politics is correspondingly lower.

 

Golf Juliet Tango
Offline
Last seen: 56 min 9 sec ago
Joined: 17/04/2014
16 (it would have to be 17 in the third election) states each electing two senators rather than 33 (34 in the third election) senators?

Stephen

Democratic dissent is not disloyalty, it is a positive civic duty