Sobering statistics.

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2cv7
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Sobering statistics.

Here is a sobering set of statistics.

More accidents happen at home than anywhere else
Every year there are approximately 6,000 deaths as the result of a home accident
More than two million children under the age of 15 experience accidents in and around the home every year, for which they are taken to accident and emergency units
Children under the age of five and people over 65 (particularly those over 75) are most likely to have an accident at home
Over 76,000 children under the age of 14 are admitted for treatment of which over 40% are under 5 years of age
Falls are the most common accidents, which can cause serious injury at any time of life. The risk increases with age
More women than men over the age of 65 die as the result of an accident in the home
Every year over 62 children under 14 die as a result of an accident in the home
Around 25,000 under-fives attend A&E departments each year after being accidentally poisoned
An average of 13 children a day under the age of 4 suffer a severe injury from a burn or a scald. A hot drink can still scald a small child up to 15 minutes after it is made
More accidents happen in the lounge/living room than anywhere else in the home.
Every year more than 4,200 children are involved in falls on the stairs and 4,000 children under the age of 15 are injured falling from windows
Boys have more accidents than girls
The cost to society of UK home accident injuries has been estimated at £45.63billion (£45,630million) annually.

So I guess  if we truly want to help key services then it means...

No working on our cars. No DIY. No gardening. No sport. Eat as much uncooked food as possible. Drink water.  No alcohol. Keep of the internet. no unnecessary deliveries. No Monopoly ( danger of fighting) Blimey......

Wrightpayne
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When chopping out brickwork last week with the aid of an angle grinder I did think to be extra careful - now is not the time to be attending A&E!

I've now finished with power tools on the garden re-modelling! 
 

Its a good point now that most of us are at a loose end at home!

 

Jonathan Kay
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The country would be much better off with better public understanding of risks.

Fortunately we have two chief weapons: people who are working on that and numeracy.

If anyone hasn't come across him already I suggest following Spiegelhalter by whatever medium you prefer.

And on numeracy one of the tools that he recommends is the microlife.

And after reading a bit of his stuff and working though some examples it's clear that it isn't necessary to conclude:

No working on our cars. No DIY. No gardening. No sport. Eat as much uncooked food as possible. Drink water.  No alcohol. Keep of the internet. no unnecessary deliveries. No Monopoly ( danger of fighting)

Jonathan

PS: So many accidents aren't, that's why I often put the word in quotes, and why A and E departments are moving to calling themselves EDs.

PPS: From the hand surgeons:

PPPS: Who's thinking of Swiss cheese?

Frogman
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I would be interested to know how many people are turning up at A&E in the current environment. I was once working in an A&E department in the north of England on a particularly busy day with a 4 hour average wait time and this was the early 90s.

The consultant in charge walked into the waiting room and announced that this is an accident and emergency department, we have an ambulance arriving in 5 minutes with a very seriously injured 6 year old girl from a RTA, I suggest you examine your consciences and decide whether your issue is either an accident or an emergency. If you conclude it is we will get to you as soon as we can, that is likely to be more than 4 hours.

Probably 30-40% of those in the waiting room left.

Move fast, stay low.

Jonathan Kay
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Just anecdotal so far, but last week it was many fewer than usual.

Jonathan

Midas
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I have a relative who works in a large A&E Dept. Normally it is around 800 a day - currently they are seeing less than 80.
 

Frogman
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It does make one wonder why such a dramatic drop even if there is a reduction in exposure to harm by the general populace it won't be that much. It does suggest that A&E is being used to support a requirement that could be directed elsewhere in normal times.

 

Move fast, stay low.

Jonathan Kay
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It certainly does, except that that "could" is doing a lot of heavy lifting... should/ could with current (in normal times) resources elsewhere/ could with more resources elsewhere?

Jonathan