Toyotas latest “self charging” car adverts

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Peter G
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Toyotas latest “self charging” car adverts

Now I’m not an officionado of EV’s etc, but aren’t all hybrids capable of charging their batteries???

Tazio
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It's called marketing noise..no need to have any strong opinion...its just normal advertising bull..
Jonathan Kay
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I think it's a misleading term, and I don't know why use it.

Are they trying to play on not needing to plug them in? That sounds like a disadvantage to me.

Does "hybrid" carry negative connotations?

Jonathan
 

Stridey
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Clever marketing, I had already seen Robert Llewelyn’s rant about it on YouTube....

https://youtu.be/LQQu_ux3y6M

Id like to see more whole life calculations on electric cars and more ‘tailpipe’ emission free explanations.

As a Londoner many many houses don’t have charging possibilities due to on street parking, so Hybrids make some sort of sense...

Jonathan Kay
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Got it... it's not that "hybrid" has negative connotations, it's that "not capable of being plugged in" does. So another positive term was needed.

As a Londoner many many houses don’t have charging possibilities due to on street parking...

But those streets have lamps with existing feeds that can become charging stations. There are some in London and Siemens are onto it.

Jonathan

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I have never felt that hybrids are anything but transitional technology.  They bridge the infrastructure and driver/owner "range anxiety".

All electric is the way forward in my opinion.

Stephen Hubbard

Democratic dissent is not disloyalty, it is a positive civic duty

Stridey
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JK, unless each street lamp has a designated electric charging space and they plant more lights it’s not going to work... I can’t see the balance being anywhere near right.

What I mean is that people want to park outside or as near as possible to their house, and not designating street spaces to electric charging where a car can be sat having charged but still using that space until moved is a logistical nightmare and inefficient use of space.

I have to say I’m impressed by the number of new electric London taxis there are and today I saw one with cabby eating his lunch as it was charging and most minicabs seem to be Priuses or Insights(hybrids).

I love the idea of electrics or hybrids BUT I am concerned about the whole life environmental impact, globally, not just tailpipe emissions in city centres. I don’t feel the balance is right, or calculated properly. A hybrid scrapped in 10 years versus an internal combustion engine that’s been used for 20 years, but still running as opposed to being replaced is a hard calculation. Also I am deeply concerned about tech (inbuilt screens and electronics) failing after a short lifespan, unfixable by street mechanics or enthusiastic amateurs meaning short car lifespans. but why would a car manufacturer want to make something that lasts...?

Another thing I’ve seen more of are Lime bikes (alternatives to Boris Bikes) and electric foot scooters, in Brussels and London. 

For me as a Londoner I have always liked the way my old Dutch colleagues cycled to the train station, got on a train, then picked up their other bike at their destination commute station, then at work had bike parking too. I suppose the Boris bike was meant to sort of work like that, but it never worked fully. Finsbury Park has/had a secure bike rack, but Rotterdam Station had a massive bike store, a workshop and gutters on the stairs if you took a bike in out of rush hour.

 

 

 

john aston
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Both my nephew and sister have bought Toyota hybrids in the last few weeks , and both have extolled the virtue of self charging . So it works - and good for Toyota for exploiting the angst which puts so many off buying leccy cars .

Last week I went to Goodwood, and the 700 mile round trip  meant a few motorway services stops. The usual scene- a separate, spacious and clean Tesla charging area  with room for 20 cars and , in contrast,  some miserly corner of the car park , litter strewn and with enough room for only two or three 'normal' electric cars .   

Roger King
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"it's not that "hybrid" has negative connotations, it's that "not capable of being plugged in" does. So another positive term was needed."

Precisely my first thought when I first saw the term "self charging hybrid".

Advertisers are very clever at speaking with mendacious intent, but without quite putting themselves in a position to be accused of lying.

Many years ago, in the early days of mobile phones, I remember one provider running a radio ad. campaign claiming that they were "putting up more transmitters, in more locations than any other phone company". This is a fantastic piece of doublespeak, giving the impression that they had better coverage than anyone else, but actually stating that they had worse coverage and were desperately trying to catch up.

Jonathan Kay
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Advertisers are very clever at speaking with mendacious intent, but without quite putting themselves in a position to be accused of lying.

Yes. And IMHO the regulatory bar should be moved accordingly. Approximately all advertisements for cosmetics and "health products" would be seriously affected.

But the greatest current public harm probably results from advertisements for gambling that imply that burning money online is a happy social endeavour when it would be more honest to portray it as lonely and isolated.

Jonathan

Roger King
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Difficult to disagree with those comments.

"Inspired by science", "reduces the appearance of", are two of the utterly meaningless phrases that seem to be currently doing the rounds in the health and cosmetics advertising world.

As for the gambling ads, my daughter has been heavily affected by them; her husband has developed an addiction and has now left her.

I'm tempted to ask if advertisers think the population is stupid, but unfortunately, their apparent success renders the question moot.