Understanding Walking and Cycling

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Jonathan Kay
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Boardman was interviewed on BBC Radio 4 this evening. He emphasised several points: * Cycling is good for you * It's less dangerous than people think * We need to keep animosity out of the debate * What do we want the places we live in to look like in 10y time? Jonathan
Jonathan Kay
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Cycling gets £94m push in England: BBC News coverage ... as usual can't tell whether this is new capital or not, and £94M isn't much at this level, but probably better than not. Jonathan
TobyCoulson
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Quoting Jonathan Kay: Cycling gets £94m push in England: BBC News coverage ... as usual can't tell whether this is new capital or not, and £94M isn't much at this level, but probably better than not. Jonathan I wonder if any of it will be spent on an advertising campaign telling cyclists and other road users to employ common-sense when they come into contact with each other. I doubt it and that's where a lot of the problems lie these days. Lack of education about the basics of using the the highways.
Mort
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Just been watching an interview about this on the BBC. Interviewee from pro cycling group stated that we should all cycle to work because that will half the risk of diabetes. No mention of that fact that it will vastly increase the number of RTAs involving bikes, which would probably negate the figures related to potential health advantages. That's the problem with this debate - it's very one-sided in favour of the advantages of cycling, whilst conveniently ignoring the dangers. The reality is that until cyclists and motorists are separated cycling will remain a potentially dangerous activity. The economy is based upon motorised transport, and expecting that to change in order that others can indulge in a hobby is unrealistic. We need cyclists to stick to available cycle lanes, but that doesn't happen because cyclists don't want to do it. So why bother to spend money? Increasingly inhibiting motorists without enforcement aimed at cyclists is only addressing half of the problem.
Nick Woods
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Quoting TobyCoulson: I wonder if any of it will be spent on an advertising campaign telling cyclists and other road users to employ common-sense when they come into contact with each other. I doubt it and that's where a lot of the problems lie these days. Lack of education about the basics of using the the highways. Agreed; although in my experience that majority of people I come across when cycling and driving around Norfolk do follow the rules of the road and treat each other with respect so I doubt whether the remainder would be affected by any sort of education campaign. Obviously things may be different in other places, especially London where I personally wouldnt want to drive orcycle. One of the places mentioned in the BBC article is Norwich so I'll keep an eye out for what they do with the money.
Jonathan Kay
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Quoting Mort: Just been watching an interview about this on the BBC. Interviewee from pro cycling group stated that we should all cycle to work because that will half the risk of diabetes. No mention of that fact that it will vastly increase the number of RTAs involving bikes, which would probably negate the figures related to potential health advantages.The health gains from cycling probably greatly outweigh the health losses (such as RTAs) but they are widely spread and not as dramatic as the accidents. For example The health risks and benefits of cycling in urban environments compared with car use: health impact assessment study:Quote:Abstract Objective To estimate the risks and benefits to health of travel by bicycle, using a bicycle sharing scheme, compared with travel by car in an urban environment. Design Health impact assessment study. Setting Public bicycle sharing initiative, Bicing, in Barcelona, Spain. Participants 181,982 Bicing subscribers. Main outcomes measures The primary outcome measure was all cause mortality for the three domains of physical activity, air pollution (exposure to particulate matter <2.5 µm), and road traffic incidents. The secondary outcome was change in levels of carbon dioxide emissions. Results Compared with car users the estimated annual change in mortality of the Barcelona residents using Bicing (n=181 982) was 0.03 deaths from road traffic incidents and 0.13 deaths from air pollution. As a result of physical activity, 12.46 deaths were avoided (benefit:risk ratio 77). The annual number of deaths avoided was 12.28. As a result of journeys by Bicing, annual carbon dioxide emissions were reduced by an estimated 9,062,344 kg. Jonathan Edited by - Jonathan Kay on 4 Mar 2014 22:02:39
TobyCoulson
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Quoting Mort: Just been watching an interview about this on the BBC. Interviewee from pro cycling group stated that we should all cycle to work because that will half the risk of diabetes. No mention of that fact that it will vastly increase the number of RTAs involving bikes, which would probably negate the figures related to potential health advantages. I saw that and thought the same but she did have nice norks
Nick Woods
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Quoting Mort: No mention of that fact that it will vastly increase the number of RTAs involving bikes, which would probably negate the figures related to potential health advantages. Cycling has been on the rise for a while now; it would be interesting to see if the rate of RTAs has increased in proportion (one for Jonathan maybe \" class=\"smiley\" />). If more cyclists on the roads means less cars then the RTA rate could go down (less cars to be hit by) or up (more cyclist to aim at; much harder to miss one when there are so many about) Quoting Mort: We need cyclists to stick to available cycle lanes, but that doesn't happen because cyclists don't want to do it. The problem as I see it is that a lot of cycle lanes are either badly laid out or share the footway and are thus often full of pedestrians, and whislt trundling along at 5mph and stopping every 50 yards for yet another side road suits some people it doesnt suit others. Whats needed IMHO is seperate cycle lanes which are either in the main carriageway or run parallel to it with the same priority over side roads.
Nick Woods
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JK beat me to it \" class=\"smiley\" />
Jonathan Kay
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Quoting Nick Woods: Cycling has been on the rise for a while now; it would be interesting to see if the rate of RTAs has increased in proportionThe rate is worryingly up in the UK. But the increase in cycling hasn't been as high elsewhere as it has in London. Users of the London rental scheme also seem to have a disproportionately low rate of serious accidents and deaths. So the statistics may be about to get interesting. Jonathan Edited by - Jonathan Kay on 12 Aug 2013 09:08:17