Aluminium Flywheel for X-flow

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Ken Numsaki
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Aluminium Flywheel for X-flow
Hi All. I am thinking about to change the x-flow Iron flywheel to aluminium. Aluminium FW and tilton 7.25 clutch total weight is(about) 12LB!. It will make good engine response by low inertia. However, I am worried about the following. Does anyone have informations? 1.Loosen the flywheel bolts (ali is softer than Iron), Should be use the large steel washer or not? 2.How long the 7.25"metal clutch life? Regards I am making a Light weight Xflow but it needs heavy money.
YW Sin
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Hi, Why don't you just lighten the current steel flywheel? It is not a difficult modification and Very effective. By the way, who makes aluminum flywheels for X-flows?? A ll standard, Classic 1.7 X-flow
Sheds Moderator
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I wouldn't worry about clutch life - I think you will wear out your flywheel before the clutch! Actually, will ally work as a flywheel? Does it work on brake discs or will it blind the friction material in the same way that it does if you attempt to grind it?
Ken Numsaki
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Hi Sin and Angel. Because Seven car weight (under 600Kgw) is lighter than normal passenger car( xflow donor car like cortina), It does not needs height inertia maybe. (And all seven man has good driving skill maybe) So I think that it can be more lighten the FW inertia for engine pick up. My Iron FW weight is 4.9Kgw( inc clutch weight 10.3Kw). But Ithink that more light FW makes better ebngine response. Dave bean engineering in US. http://www.davebean.com/title.htm It has steel friction plate bolt on.
R2D2
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An aluminium flywheel will certainly need a steel insert to allow the clutch to grip correctly and you will need to make sure that you use an aluminium alloy with sufficient strength so that you don't end up with a fatigue failure. Flywheels are subjected to a relatively high mean torque and if they are very light they may also see a torsional impluse that can cause fatigue. I general I would worry about alloy flywheels for anything other than drag racing or short sprints when the flywheel can be routinely inspected. If the aluminium does break then the starter ring will flail around and could cause a lot of damage and could well break through an aluminium bellhousing. A good quality high strength alloy steel flywheel that has been correctly stressed must be safer.
Anthony
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Hi Have a chat with Roger King, he put a really nice FW on my x-flow, I think it was Titan, but not completely sure.
Tony Martyr
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Ken, This is a seriously bad idea. Cast iron or high carbon steels have friction and surface finish to deal with the task of full and partial power transmission. The friction materials of clutches have been developed for these charactoristics. If the rotational inertia is to be reduced then the flywheel shape is changed or other strategies like the WR car disconnection from the crank are used. "Flywheels store and release energy they are not to be taken lightly"
mhc
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ali flywheels are fine, with a steel ring gear and ceramic coating on the friction face, i have run one for a year in a VX westfied no problems. MHC
Tony C
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Michael, I think it would have been better to have said .... "Fine so far" Agree with Tony on this one - playing with fire IMHO
mhc
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I can only agree , so far so good. But it is current eqipment on F3000 and WRCs , complete with carbon clutches.
Tony Martyr
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Of course there are exotic composite flywheels with ceramic coatings and matched friction plates. But aliminium for CI or steel swop is not a good idea. carbon-carbon and the like are a totally different construction and WR cars dont have a conventional direct to crank arrangement - but they have to deal with 600Nm at quite low revs which is probably beyond most of our cars as is the control strategy to get their extraordinary power curve that is air flow constrained to 7500 rpm having seen the results I worry about modification of flywheels; it seems to be thought of as solely a part of the clutch system rather than the torsional damper and potentially dangerous disk projectile it is.