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alan c
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Ok I don't have a bias valve I would have spotted it in those locations. 

Order you set out is the order I have been following.

I will persuade "boss" to help again tomorrow evening and see if going back to traditional method makes any difference. I had best put the heater in the garage for a while first though. It is an integral garage with some insulation but it has not been very warm this weekend.

 

alan c
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Last seen: 2 weeks 11 hours ago
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Ok I don't have a bias valve I would have spotted it in those locations. 

Order you set out is the order I have been following.

I will persuade "boss" to help again tomorrow evening and see if going back to traditional method makes any difference. I had best put the heater in the garage for a while first though. It is an integral garage with some insulation but it has not been very warm this weekend.

 

Pendennis
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Yep a tad chilly, My missus hates doing it but promise her a new handbag!

It's quite important to get those rear calipers up high, good luck

elie boone
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I use an old reservoir cap with a hole drilled in it and pressurize it with a blow gun at 0.4 bar and never had issues bleeding except once for a faulty Sierra caliper.

John Vine
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The front AP 4-pots have two nipples per calliper.  Are you bleeding the inner nipple first, and then the outer?

For info, the Assembly Guide says:

"The uprated front brakes have two bleed screws on each calliper. Remove the dust cover from the inboard bleed screw on the front LH calliper. Connect the flexible tube to the bleed screw and operate the brake pedal several times. Whilst mounting pressure on the brake pedal open the bleed screw and allow compressed air and brake fluid to flow into the container. Tighten the bleed screw before the pedal is released. Repeat the procedure until no air bubbles are visible in the released brake fluid. Remove the flexible tube and replace the dust cap. Carry out the procedure for the outboard bleed screw."

JV

MADMALC
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I think you need to run the car and bed the brakes in and then do another bleed to be sure that the problem is air or indeed the master cylinder.

If you have done as John has shown above then my suggestion seems the next logical step.

Both 7s I have built had 'squidgy' pedals till the whole system had had some use (abuse).

R.I.P. SLR No.27.

Pendennis
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You should never have squidgy pedals at any point either during or after assembly!!

It is not that important whether you do the inner or outer bleed first or second. As a rule of thumb the motor trade normally start furthest away from MC and work their way in, but it isn't that important on ours.

alan c
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I have tried the front calipers several times sometimes inner first and sometimes outer and it makes no difference.

The pedal is so soft it is not safe to take the car on the road, it was bad enough turning the car round in the road to reverse it into the garage for easier access.

Going to try traditional approach next and see what happens and it has also been suggested I leave it under pressure for several hours and see what happens. 

Pendennis
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Blimey, they are bad. What master cylinder you got and what fluid you using?

Pendennis
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Blimey, they are bad. What master cylinder you got and what fluid you using?