DIY Guide: Sump Guard for CSR (and possibly other metric Series 3 cars)

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David Brown
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James, did you think of only using the 6mm plate packed out under the rear pipe clamps to save using the wooden packer and checker plate. 
My clearance is 70mm with ZZS tyres and slight suspension raising all round. Have never bottomed the sump but try to be very careful. 

James B
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Replying to #21

Couple of questions re. the wedge block:  what sort of wood did you use?  And do you think that a cut-down rubber jacking block / chock would work?

Neil - I wish I could be specific about the wood but, in truth, it was just cut from a left-over floor joist from an old building project!  As I said, it appears to be a semi-hard wood and I think it works well (apart from weight) as it will take take some compression on impact without losing its structural integrity, and in so doing it might even absorb or dissipate some of that impact energy as well.  I think a cut-down block of rubber would be an excellent substitute, though I'd still add the lower impact plate to help the wedge slide over the obstacle and to reduce the chances of the rubber block disintegrating.

As a contrast, I mentioned that I considered a lightweight structural foam for the wedge and I found some material that is used for lifting pads on commercial vehicle lifts.  I actually formed a wedge from this and was (still am) very tempted to use it but I just couldn't convince myself that it would remain in one piece upon impact, so I stuck with the wooden approach.  The foam (which certainly looked more 'engineered') might well have been fine, sandwiched between the platform base plate and the angled impact plate... hard to tell.  It's much, much tougher than you might imagine from the photos, which I'm adding below just for interest.

James

 

James B
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Replying to #22:

...did you think of only using the 6mm plate packed out under the rear pipe clamps to save using the wooden packer and checker plate.

I think the problem with that approach, David, would be getting sufficient structural integrity into an angled plate arrangement - the mounting to the cruciform would likely be significantly compromised and the plate itself would probably need to be thicker (and heavier) to have sufficient bending stiffness in the direction of anticipated impact loads.

The fact that the base platform/plate is rigidly mounted and 'interlocked' to the cruciform members (and in the same plane) provides great strength - and it's handy having a known horizontal surface to work from as well. 

I'm happy to be proven wrong, of course, but I doubt that you could mount an angled plate that would withstand anything approaching the impact loads involved in a worst-case incident (things like raised manhole covers and so on - mentioned surprisingly frequently on forum posts!), particularly given the circa 50mm height difference that's needed between the front and rear edges of the guard.   But if there's a simpler way...

James

John Vine
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Excellent stuff, James!  Well done.  That looks like a well-designed and well-engineered solution.

I now need to see whether it would work on my metric S3 Duratec with a wet sump.  £50 versus £500+ for a replacement Raceline sump sounds like a good investment.

Have you considered converting your excellent work into a Technical Guide? 

JV

 

Frogman
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Nice work James and thanks for the detail. I really like the design and am sure it will work. Had you thought about a teflon or nylon wedge and no aluminium bash plate. I would imagine it would satisfy the strike and glide intent more effectively. I appreciate the effort on this and it is food for thought for sure.

Move fast, stay low.

James B
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Replying to #26

I agree, Frogman - a Teflon, Nylon 6, acetal or similar polymer block could well be the perfect material to use for the wedge except for two reservations that held me back. 

The first is cost; try as I might, I couldn't find a suitably sized block of one of these materials for much less than £90 or so - often more - and that's getting a bit serious for me.  And the second concern is how you actually work these materials to produce the required wedge shape.  These polymers can be very difficult to cut using typical domestic tools (in fact, they can be very hard to cut and shape even if you have a reasonably equipped machine-shop on hand) so that it also a major consideration.

But I'd certainly prefer a polymer approach if I could find a way to overcome those two issues.

James

nigelpugh
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Hi James,

An excellent looking solution created there!

I know it would double the cost, but would the genuine Caterham nylon wedge work added to your masterpiece to replace the wooden block?

https://caterhamparts.co.uk/dry-sump/6506-dry-sump-wedge-kit.html?search_query=Sump+gaurd&results=130

Just a suggestion if you wanted to look at alternatives.

 

James B
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Hi Nigel.  Unfortunately not - the Caterham so-called dry sump wedge (which actually protects the bellhousing flange) is very much smaller in all dimensions than is needed to protect the lowflying Cosworth dry-sump. 

I have one on my R500; it's quite a complex component that is part-cast and part-machined to shape.  A lovely piece in its own right, actually, but not of use in this application.

James

nigelpugh
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Shame, yes i thought you would have one on the R500, i just remembered fitting mine to my R500 Kit build.

It's back to your drawing/designing board then!!

 

Frogman
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#27 Gotcha, I didn't think they would be that expensive but I haven't looked. Next suggestion would be one of the thinner nylon chipping boards laminated on a thinner piece of aluminium than the cheque plate. Wood as shock absorption, or the foam wedge mentioned, aluminium for shock distribution and plastic chopping board for glide. I am also very conscious I am coming up with smart arse ideas from an arm chair sadly 5,000 miles away from my car or I would be doing this.

Move fast, stay low.