Do springs grow old? Ans: kinda probably, cheap to renew anyway.

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anthonym
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Do springs grow old? Ans: kinda probably, cheap to renew anyway.

By which I mean get weak or otherwise lose specification, over 20 years.

or can I just have them repainted and refit with serviced shocks?

no part numbers apparent, nor specs so uncertainty governs at present.

no one really seems to know.

anthony

rj
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They break over time - guess it's fatigue.

My brothers Ford Granada from around 1977 had lowered itself over time without breaking the springs, so I guess they can grow old. Nowadays it's more common to break though.

 

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Phil G
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I would say yes. Like most ferrous items, they are subject to corrosion, wear and probably metal fatigue.

I'm sure we have some metallurgist in the fold who can give a scientific answer. 

auyt
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Older spring material definitely, you can have them reset/tempered that helps. But new springs seem to last longer due better steel allows. 

Life's too short to drive milquetoast cars

Simon.Rogers
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Most springs do grow old.  There are very few with any warranty.

The Hyperco brand does have a lifetime warranty.

 

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anthonym
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thanks all, any idea how to identify their spec? I guess that means "poundage"?

anthonym
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I have found from the original Options list 

Race Dampers front & rear

dated 30 May 2000

price  n/c  presumably "no charge"

 

EDIT: 

and later invoice "Coil springs x 2 2.25ID-8-225 " 

EEK
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Well, once spring is removed, if you stand on it how much does it go down by? In that the rating, is required weight to compress the spring by 1 inch, well according to this it is 

https://www.knowyourparts.com/technical-resources/suspension/springs-and-suspenstion/

garybee
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Well, once spring is removed, if you stand on it how much does it go down by? In that the rating, is required weight to compress the spring by 1 inch, well according to this it is 

Anyone else getting a picture of a slightly 'heavy set' bloke doing a one legged squat, balancing on a spring which he's trying to measure with a rule.  Technically that is the way to measure it (a spring tester does exactly this) but it sounds tricky to me.

Bricol
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Take a drill press.

A pair of bathroom scales.

A steel rule.

 

Place spring and rule vertcially on scales, the spring under the chuck.  Zero the scale.  Wind drill press down, compressing the spring a measured amount as seen on the rule alongside.  Read the scales.

Voila . . .

Something on the scales under the spring to spread the load helps. 

garybee
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I was thinking about suggesting something similar with a cheap hydraulic press (bottle jack type) but thought he was unlikely to have access to one.  I hadn't thought about using a drill press.  As long as you're confident the spring has a linear rate I suppose you only need to compress it an inch.  In that case you're only looking at about 100kgf and even a chintzy drill press should do.