Random tool recommendation

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Mechanical Moz
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There's a special place in hell for people who don't flush cut cable ties, leaving wiring looms like rose bushes. Curse

Wrightpayne
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I use a pair of nail clippers to finish off the tie wraps - you can crop them really close and has a very slight curve.

John Vine
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Re #53:

Thanks for the tip!  I'll use that in future (although I might have to purloin Mrs V's clippers).

JV

Wodybode
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I really like my Wera Tool Check Plus. It's pretty compact and beautifully engineered, you just have to shop around as the price seems to vary a lot.

https://www.travisperkins.co.uk/multi-tools/wera-39-piece-tool-check-plus-multi-tool/p/519484

Andy

 

Jonathan Kay
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There's a special place in hell for people who don't flush cut cable ties, leaving wiring looms like rose bushes.

That was the only criticism at my post-build inspection. I now use the end cutting nippers from the wallet of posh pliers.

Jonathan

PS: When we're striking theatre sets everyone tries to save money by undoing the vast numbers of cable ties... until they've had enough and start cutting. But sometimes not everyone changes at the same time ... :-)

tbird
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we have solved that problem, we only use 3 inch screws and impact drivers or Gaffa , the one exception is when using material to cover things, then its a staple gun set to Half pressure, and the same place in hell that is reserved for the none cable tie flushers is also reserved for those that leave broken bits of staple legs sticking out of flats after the strike.

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Wrightpayne
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Discovered this recently which has been brilliant to shape the new handle for a sledge hammer. I seem to remember it was about a fiver! Half round file / rasp...

Curly
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As this thread has cost me significants amount of money it's time to get recommendations for the next "essential" item.

Any recommendations for a thread guide -  also seen it called  thread pitch guide  - lots on Ebay but ,I would welcome recommendations .

I realise, " sadly", I might need to buy multiple ones for metric, imperial etc

Thanks

Curly

Edzup Ezzer
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I think what you are after is actually better known as a thread gauge.  As you say, there are loads on ebay and they can be bought for as little as £3.  I wouldn't recommend one of those but for a few quid more you should be able to buy a half decent metric and imperial set for about £10-£15.  You can spend a lot more but for your probable needs a set for less than £15 should serve you well.  Make sure the markings on each 'leaf' are legible.  Mine cost less than a tenner years ago and are very useful but the markings are hard to read.  Keeping them lightly 'oiled' is a good idea.

You make no reference to measuring diameter, essential when using a thread gauge.  Presumably you have that covered?  If not you can pick up a reasonable vernier caliper for a similar amount.  I see there's even a Moore and Wright 6" vernier (a well regarded brand) available on-line for £20 delivered, or even a Mitutoyo for under £40!  Whatever you use, get one with a case.  

As you've already found out, acquiring the 'necessary' tools is an easy way to spend "significants amount of money" but with care you should build yourself a decent tool library.  

Ezzer

Titanium7
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I know the 'tinternet' will find you most information I have always found this small reference guide for all things Drills, Reaming, Threads etc., immensely useful over the years. I'm still quite analogue finding paper based information easier to read and also of the generation that was brought up using both Imperial and Metric units of measurement.

I often find myself using both metric and imperial measurements on the same job when setting out!

 

 

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