Ride height adjustment

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Roy Blyth
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Ride height adjustment

Some simple advice, please!

Our car is a standard 2015 SuperSport, with a de-dion and anti-roll bar at the rear.  We're trying to lower the rear ride height and I assumed that we could do this by winding the Bilstein spring platforms down.  However, they are already wound right down as that is how they were supplied in the kit?

Springs 'n things are the work of the devil to me, so I would appreciate any simple explanation as to how I can achieve a lower ride height.  I know I need to check the ground clearance front and rear (with or without a pile of bricks onboard and a couple of Coke cans or beer bottles underneath!), but I would like to understand the theory a bit better.

Roy

nickh7
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Talk to Dave at Gemzoe motorsport , he’s a guru on such things 

http://www.gemzoe.com/contact 

 

 

"I take her to the floor, looking for a moment when the world feels right"

SM25T
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See if there are more circlip grooves on the damper bodies. If not, you can machine new ones. Are you checking heights with your weight(s) in the seats ?
russjones
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Greetings

You will have an extra groove on your damper to move the very small circlip that you can hardly believe holds the platform up

You do not need to machine new ones I know as I have the exact (virtually) same 7

Once moved all will become clear

If you are near Nottinghamshire happy to assist meet or talk you through it

 

 

Geoff Brown
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There is something seriously wrong with the rake of the car if the rear platforms are wound right down!! Doesn't the car handle like a brick?

There is a basic set up:

Driver weight in the drivers seat + at least half a tank of fuel.

Adjust front dampers to a minimum of 150mm between the ground & the bottom of the chassis rail where the rear leg of the front lower wishbone exits the side of the car. The maximum height is 190mm.

Adjust the rear dampers to achieve a height of 15mm higher than the front measured from the ground to the underside of the chassis rail immediately in front of the A frame mounting point.

After adjustment roll the car forward & back then check the ride height as you may have to go round & adjust again.

You should find that after adjustment & if the drivers weight is 'average' that the offside rear platform should have approximately 12 - 14 threads showing & the near side approximately 4 - 6 threads.

Best way to measure the ground to chassis measurement is to cut two metal strip go/no gauges to your desired heights.

 

 

 

Roy Blyth
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Thanks for all the advice.  The strange thing is that it does not 'handle like a brick'.  It's not perfect and the two drivers have done two sprints now and are not complaining of anything drastic.

Anyway, we're going to take some measurements first before we do anything and then follow Geoff's advice, if possible.

Watch this space...  Idea 

Roy Blyth
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Okay, it's wet 'n windy out there, so we've been playing in the garage and whipped one of the rear dampers off.  We've wound the platform adjuster and lock ring up and now have the black collar sitting on it's own at the bottom, with what looks like a circlip set into it, as per the photo (damper upside down).  The question is, how do I get the circlip out without destroying it?  I've tried winding the collar up to expose it, but it just turns the whole threaded column.

Suggestions please, before someone finds me jobs to do in the house...! Rolleyes 

John Alston
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Screw the spring platform back onto the black collar and then gently tap both away from the circlip with a mallet.  Once the circlip is on its own you can attempt to open it and work it toward the groove you want to use.  Beware though that the circlip can be a real pig to open up enough to move it out of the groove.  You may finish up just freeing one end and working your way round to the other.  Take care though, as although they're quite tough you don't want to stretch it and make it loose in the groove.  Good luck 

Bricol
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Use a pair of circlip pliers to open it out, lift it out and keep it open just enough to slide along- tricky to keep balanced on the pliers ends, but doable.

Before you slide the platform down, liberally coat the shock body with anti-seize grease - I've used a loctite one and a PTFE based one in the past.   Otherwise, despite the shock being powder coated, and the collar anodised, in a few years you may well find the only way to shift the collar is with a BIG hammer and lots of heat - or indeed, the collar has cracked from the swelling corrosion between collar and shock.

Mine own have been pretty good by doing this, but I bought a second hand set that were bad!

Bricol
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Slight update - swopping shocks this week from leaking 50.000 mile originals to a refurbed set.   Looks like I used copperease on one shock . . . and that one needed some pursuading with heat and a lump hammer to shift the sleeve from the shock. 

Have to be carefull with heat - enough to warm the aluminium (which expands nicely and rapidly) before the shock gets too hot and starts to catch up.